110 Street


ONE-HUNDRED-TENTH STREET station is also named Cathedral Parkway. The Cathedral of St. John the Divine, on Amsterdam Avenue, was one of the other great works by the architectural partnership of Heins and LaFarge, the architects of the original IRT. George Heins and Christopher LaFarge met each other while architecture students at MIT in the 1880's, and while their partnership may not have the name that certain other firms did, they indeed have left a lasting legacy. The task of decorating the new IRT was quite a challenging one, perhaps most so because it was a kind of space completely new to most New Yorkers.

THIS PHOTOGRAPH shows a layout similar to that shown in the photograph for 91 Street station, with the ticket booth, and gates controlling entrance and exit. The design of the rectangular frames on the walls is like that at 96 Street. A "110" panel may be seen at the upper right between two of these frames. To the right of the ticket booth is a clock like those found in many of the original stations.






103 Street 116 Street

[City Hall] [Brooklyn Bridge] [Worth St.] [Canal St.] [Spring St.]
[Bleecker St.] [Astor Place] [14 St.] [18 St.] [23 St.] [28 St.] [33 St.]
[Grand Central] [Times Square]
[50 St.] [59 St.] [66 St.] [72 St.] [79 St.] [86 St.] [91 St.] [96 St.]
[103 St.] [110 St.] [116 St.] [125 St.] [137 St.] [145 St.]


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